On Immunosuppressive Medications? 4 Tips For Better Dental Health

When you are taking immunosuppressive medications, the risk of simple infections turning into life-threating emergencies is a concern. There are ways you can reduce your chances of dental infections and injuries with a suppressed immune system. Change Your Toothbrush More Often In general, you should change your toothbrush every three months, but when you have additional concerns about infections, you should change your toothbrush more frequently. A damp toothbrush is the ideal environment for the growth of bacterial, mold and yeast. [Read More]

How To Retain Oral Health When Your Child Has Cystic Fibrosis

Children with cystic fibrosis must receive the medical care that they desperately need.  If you have either a son or daughter with this disease, then lung distress and the formation of thick mucus within the bronchial tubes should be your main concern.  You also need to be worried about oral health, because there are some conditions that are likely to arise with the disease. Consider the information below so that oral health can be maintained. [Read More]

Understanding Allergic Reactions To Local Anesthetic

Allergic reactions to local anesthetic are somewhat rare, as the compounds have been developed over the years to contain substances that don't cause bad reactions. With that said, some people do experience an allergic response to these substances, so it's important that you understand what causes the reaction and what can be done to help you.   How Do You Know if You're Allergic to Local Anesthetic? The symptoms of local anesthetic allergy are very similar to many other allergies (such as peanuts or pineapple). [Read More]

Advanced Dental Tools For A Successful Root Canal

If you take great care of your teeth and see your dentist on a regular basis, then you likely have a gorgeous smile with very little decay. Your teeth should remain healthy as long as you follow the instructions that are provided by your dentist. Sometimes, however, small cracks or holes form in the teeth in between dental visits. This can allow bacteria to enter the insides of your teeth. Bacteria feed off the blood rich pulp and leave pus and other acidic fluids behind. [Read More]